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Foreign Body Ingestion

Foreign body ingestion is not infrequently observed in children between the ages of 6 months and 3 years. Most objects will pass without problem, thus in many patients a conservative approach will be taken. In some, however, (immediate) removal is mandatory. Open safety pins, objects larger than

6 cm in the stomach (Welch et al. 1986) and button batteries (not because of their size but because of their content) need to be removed, as well as foreign bodies retained in the stomach or duodenum for more than 1 week.

A "mouth-to-anus" image is essential to find the foreign body, an en-face appearance in the neck of a small round coin proves that it is in the esophagus (Fig. 3.17a,b).

Fig. 3.17a,b. Coin en-face on AP radiograph, thus located in the esophagus as confirmed on the lateral view

Fig. 3.17a,b. Coin en-face on AP radiograph, thus located in the esophagus as confirmed on the lateral view b a a

Fig. 3.18. a Juvenile polyposis: gastric polyps in a patient with peroral mucositis (Courtesy of Dr. Carlo Buonomo, Boston, MA, USA). b Gastritis/duodenitis in an 8-year-old eventually diagnosed with Crohn disease b a

Fig. 3.18. a Juvenile polyposis: gastric polyps in a patient with peroral mucositis (Courtesy of Dr. Carlo Buonomo, Boston, MA, USA). b Gastritis/duodenitis in an 8-year-old eventually diagnosed with Crohn disease

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