MS Vessels

The main artery which supplies the eye and orbit is the ophthalmic a. It originates from the internal carotid and courses anteriorly, following the optic nerve on its lateral aspect into the optic canal. After crossing it, the artery gives rise to a lateral branch, the lacrimal artery, directed to the gland and the lateral rectus muscle, and a medial branch, the central retinal artery, the only artery to the retina. Afterwards, the artery curves medially, crossing the nerve on its upper surface and gives rise to its terminal branches:

muscular, anterior and posterior ethmoids, medial palpebral, supraorbital, supratrochlear, dorsal nasal.

There are two ophthalmic veins: superior and inferior, devoid of valves

1. The superior ophthalmic vein (v. ophthalmica superior) begins at the inner angle of the orbit from the nasofrontal vein which communicates anteriorly with the angular vein; it pursues the same course as the ophthalmic artery, and receives tributaries corresponding to the branches of that vessel. It passes between the two heads of the lateral rectus and through the medial part of the superior orbital fissure, and ends in the cavernous sinus.

2. The inferior ophthalmic vein (v. ophthalmica inferior) begins from a venous network located anteriorly on the floor and medial wall of the orbit; it receives some muscular and lacrimal veins, runs backward into the lower part of" the orbit and divides into two branches. One of these passes through the inferior orbital fissure and joins the pterygoid venous plexus, while the other enters the cranium through the superior orbital fissure and ends in orbital 'aspect the cavernous sinus.

Superior orbital fissure

Zygomatic bone, orbital aspect

Ireater wing of the sphenoid bone, orbital aspect

Inferior orbital fissure

Optic canal

Lamina papyracea of ethmoid bone

Frontal process of maxillary bone

Lacrimal bone

Infraorbital groove

Optic canal

Lamina papyracea of ethmoid bone

Frontal process of maxillary bone

Lacrimal bone

Infraorbital groove

Lateral rectus muscle

Orbital fat

Sphenoid sinus

Cornea Aqueous humor Tarsal plate of the eyelid Vitreous body Lamina papyracea of ethmoidal bone Medial rectus muscle

Lateral rectus muscle

Orbital fat

Sphenoid sinus

Nasal septum

Ciliary body

Zonular fibers

— Choroid Sclera

Periorbit ^ Ethmoidal cells

Optic nerve

Orbital fat

Lateral rectus muscle

Ethmoidal cells

Cornea

Sclera

Medial rectus muscle

Periorbit

Ophthalmic artery

Common tendinous ring

Cornea

Sclera

Medial rectus muscle

Periorbit

Ophthalmic artery

Common tendinous ring

Tendon of the superior oblique muscle

Eyeball

Lacrimal gland

Ethmoidal cells

Trochlea of the superior oblique muscle

Orbital fat

Periorbit

Superior ophthalmic vein

Superior oblique muscle

Common tendinous ring Ophthalmic artery Internal carotid artery

Trochlea of the superior oblique muscle

Orbital fat

Periorbit

Superior ophthalmic vein

Superior oblique muscle

Common tendinous ring Ophthalmic artery Internal carotid artery

Fatty body of the orbit

Levator palpebrae superioris muscle

Superior rectus muscle

Medial orbital gyrus

Olfactory trigone

Subcallosal gyrus

Frontal sinuses

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