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Fig. 10.11. Trunk combination: upper and lower trunk extension using lifting to the right and bilateral leg extension to the left

Fig. 10.12. Trunk combination: lifting to the left with bilateral leg flexion to the left

D Fig. 10.10a-c. Trunk combination: chopping to the left with bilateral leg flexion to the right

Fig. 10.12. Trunk combination: lifting to the left with bilateral leg flexion to the left

References

Angel RW, Eppler WG Jr (1967) Synergy of contralateral muscles in normal subjects and patients with neurologic disease. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 48:233-239 Davies PM (2000) Steps to follow. A guide to the treatment of adult hemiplegia. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York Johnson GS, Johnson VS (2002) The application of the principles and procedures of PNF for the care of lumbar spinal instabilities. J Manual Manipulative Ther (2): 83-105 Kendall FP, McCreary EK (1993) Muscles, testing and function. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore a b c

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Fire Up Your Core

Fire Up Your Core

If you weaken the center of any freestanding structure it becomes unstable. Eventually, everyday wear-and-tear takes its toll, causing the structure to buckle under pressure. This is exactly what happens when the core muscles are weak – it compromises your body’s ability to support the frame properly. In recent years, there has been a lot of buzz about the importance of a strong core – and there is a valid reason for this. The core is where all of the powerful movements in the body originate – so it can essentially be thought of as your “center of power.”

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