Symmetrical Reciprocal and Asymmetrical Exercises

In addition to the exercises carried out with one body part in one direction (the scapula moving into anterior elevation) and in both directions (the scapula moving back and forth between anterior elevation and posterior depression), both scapulae or the scapula and pelvis can be exercised simultaneously. Any combination of scapular and pelvic patterns may be used, depending on the goal of the treatment and the abilities of the patient. Here we describe and illustrate two combinations. Use the basic procedures (grip, command, resistance, timing, etc.) and techniques when you use the symmetrical and asymmetrical pattern combinations just as when you work with single patterns in one direction.

6.6.1 Symmetrical-Reciprocal Exercise

Here the scapula and pelvis move in the same diagonal but in opposite patterns (O Fig. 6.18, 6.19, 6.20). You position your body parallel to the lines of the diagonals.

This combination of scapular and pelvic motions results in full trunk elongation and shortening with counter rotation. The motion is an enlarged version of the normal motion of scapula, pelvis and trunk during walking. Other functional activities can be rolling, pushing something away from you, reaching overhead.

Scapular anterior elevation-pelvic posterior depression (O Fig. 6.18) Scapular posterior depression-Pelvic anterior elevation (O Fig. 6.20). Trunk

Picture Asymetrical Scapulae

O Fig. 6.18a,b. Symmetrical-reciprocal exercise: the scapula moves in anterior elevation, the pelvis in posterior depression

O Fig. 6.18a,b. Symmetrical-reciprocal exercise: the scapula moves in anterior elevation, the pelvis in posterior depression

Trunk Abduction
O Fig. 6.19. Trunk extension with rotation: symmetrical reciprocal combination of scapula and pelvis with extremity motion
Italians Better Fuck Gif

Fig. 6.20a,b. Symmetrical-reciprocal exercise: the scapula moves in posterior depression, the pelvis in anterior elevation

Fig. 6.20a,b. Symmetrical-reciprocal exercise: the scapula moves in posterior depression, the pelvis in anterior elevation b a extension with rotation using a symmetrical combination of scapula anterior elevation with pelvic posterior depression with extremity motion (□ Fig. 6.19).

6.6.2 Asymmetrical Exercise

In this combination the scapula and pelvis move in opposite diagonals and the diagonals are not parallel. (□ Fig. 6.21, 6.22) Position your body in the middle and align your forearms so that one is in the line of each diagonal. You cannot use your body weight for resistance with this combination.

When both the scapula and pelvis move in the anterior patterns (forward toward each other) the result is mass trunk flexion. (□ Fig. 6.21, □ Fig. 6.23) When both move in the posterior patterns (backward away from each) other) the result is mass trunk extension with elongation (□ Fig. 6.22).

Functional Activities. Patient can move from supine to prone position and backward.

□ Figure 6.24 shows asymmetrical and symmetrical combinations used with a patient with hemi-plegia.

Asymmetrical Exercise Step Step

6.6 • Symmetrical, Reciprocal and Asymmetrical Exercises

□ Fig. 6.22a,b. Asymmetrical exercise for trunk extension: the scapula moves in posterior elevation, the pelvis in posterior depression

Williams Flexion ExercisesPelvic Anterior Elevation Pnf

□ Fig. 6.24. Patient with right hemiplegia. a Mass trunk flexion: combination of scapular anterior depression and pelvic anterior elevation. b Trunk rotation: combination of scapular posterior depression and pelvic anterior elevation a a b

Trunk Rotation Muscles

□ Fig. 6.23. Trunk flexion: Asymmetrical combination of scapula and pelvis with extremity motion

76 Chapter 6 • The Scapula and Pelvis Reference

Johnson G (1999) personal communication Kendall FP, McCreary EK (1993) Muscles, testing and function. Williams and Wilkins, Baltimore

Further Reading

Magarey ME, Jones MA (2003) Dynamic evaluation and early management of altered motor control around the shoulder complex. Manual Ther (4): 195-206 Myers JB, Lephart SM (2000) The role of the sensorimotor system in the athletic shoulder. J Athletic Training (3): 351363

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Fire Up Your Core

Fire Up Your Core

If you weaken the center of any freestanding structure it becomes unstable. Eventually, everyday wear-and-tear takes its toll, causing the structure to buckle under pressure. This is exactly what happens when the core muscles are weak – it compromises your body’s ability to support the frame properly. In recent years, there has been a lot of buzz about the importance of a strong core – and there is a valid reason for this. The core is where all of the powerful movements in the body originate – so it can essentially be thought of as your “center of power.”

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment