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11 Radius. The lateral of the two forearm bones. A B

2 Head of radius. Caput radii (radiale). Proximal end of the radius which articulates with the capitulum of the humerus. A B

3 Articular fovea. Fovea articularis. Concavity that receives the capitulum of the humerus. B

4 Articular circumference. Circumferentia ar-ticularis. Rim-like surface on the head of the radius for articulation with the radial notch of the ulna. AB

5 Neck of radius. Collum radii. Slender region at the proximal end of the radius between the head and tuberosity. A B

6 Body of radius. Corpus radii. Radial shaft. A B

7 Radial tuberosity. Tuberositas radii. Roughened prominence on the medial aspect of the radius about 2 cm distal to the proximal end. Attachment site of the biceps tendon. A B

8 Interosseous margin. Margo interosseus. Border facing the ulna and giving attachment to the interosseous membrane. A B

9 Posterior border. Facies posterior. B

10 Anterior border. Facies anterior. A

11 Lateral border. Facies lateralis. A B

11 a Pronator tuberosity. Tuberositas pronatoria.

Roughened area at the middle of the lateral surface. Attachment site of the pronator teres muscle. B

12 Posterior margin. Margo posterior. B

13 Anterior margin. Margo anterior. Margin facing anterolaterally. A

14 Styloid process. Processus styloideus. Downward projection of the lateral surface of the radius at its distal end. A B

15 Dorsal tubercle. Tuberculum dorsale. Bony ridge on the posterior aspect of the lower end of the radius between the grooves for the extensor pollicis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles. It is often palpable through the skin. B

16 Ulnar notch. Incisura ulnaris. Concavity forming the medial surface at the end of the radius for articulation with the ulna. A B

17 Articular carpal surface. Facies articularis car-palis. Joint surface on the inferior surface of the lower end of the radius for articulation with the carpus. A

18 Ulna. Medial forearm bone. A B

19 Olecranon. Proximal, posterior end of the ulna. Attachment site of the extensor muscles of the elbow joint. B

20 Coronoid process. Processus coronoideus. Anteriorly directed projection at the anterior end of the trochlear notch. A

21 Ulnar tuberosity. Tuberositas ulnae. Roughened area on the anterior surface of the upper part of the ulnar shaft for attachment of the brachialis muscle. A

22 Trochlear notch. Incisura trochlearis. Articular surface at the proximal end of the anterior surface of the ulna for articulation with the trochlea of the humerus. A

23 Radial notch. Incisura radialis. Joint surface on the lateral aspect of the ulna at the level of the coronoid process for articulation with the articular circumference of the radius. A

24 Body of ulna. Corpus ulnae. Ulnar shaft. A B

25 Posterior surface. Facies posterior. B

26 Anterior surface. Facies anterior. A

27 Medial surface. Facies medialis. Surface facing the trunk. B

28 Interosseous border. Margo interosseus. Margin providing attachment for the interosseous membrane. A B

29 Posterior margin. Margo posterior. B

30 Anterior margin. Margo anterior. Anterome-dial margin of the ulna. A

31 Supinator crest. Crista m. supinatoris. Bony ridge extending distally from the radial notch for attachment of the supinator muscle. A B

32 Head of ulna. Caput ulnae. Distal end of the ulna. A B

33 Articular circumference. Circumferentia ar-ticularis. Anterolateral articular surface of the head of the ulna for articulation with the ulnar notch of the radius. A

34 Styloid process. Processus styloideus. Peg-like process projecting downward from the pos-teromedial aspect of the lower end of the ulna. Attachment site of the articular disc and the ulnar collateral ligament. A B

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Essentials of Human Physiology

Essentials of Human Physiology

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