Establish a Monitoring System for Each Critical Control Point Principle

3.6.1. Monitoring

The Codex Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) System and Guidelines for Its Application defines monitoring as "the act of conducting a planned sequence of observations or measurements of control parameters to assess whether a CCP is under control." Monitoring procedures performed during the operation should result in written documentation that will serve as an accurate record of the operating conditions.

3.6.2. Design of a Monitoring System

The control measures are intended to control a hazard or hazards at each CCP. The monitoring procedures will determine if the control measures are being implemented and ensure that critical limits are not exceeded.

3.6.3. What Will Be Monitored?

Monitoring may mean measuring a characteristic of the product or of the process to determine compliance with a critical limit. Examples include:

• Measurement of the time and temperature of a thermal process.

• Measurement of cold-storage temperatures.

Monitoring may also mean observing whether a control measure at a CCP is being implemented. Examples include:

• Visual examination of sealed cans.

• Verification of vendor's certificates of analysis.

3.6.4. How Will Critical Limits and Preventive Measures Be Monitored?

Deviation from a critical limit should be detected in as short a time as possible to allow corrective action to limit the amount of adversely affected product. The monitoring procedures should provide rapid (real-time) results and should not involve lengthy analytical procedures. Microbiological testing is rarely effective for monitoring CCPs for this reason, and also because large sample sizes would be needed to find microorganisms at levels that may cause illness. Instead, physical and chemical mea-

Table 15

Hazard Identification: Physical Hazards

Product Name(s): Canned mushrooms

List all physical hazards related to ingredients, incoming material, processing, product flow and so on.

Identified physical hazards

Controlled at

Ingredients/Materials

Mushrooms

Could be contaminated with harmful extraneous materials,e.g., glass, metal, plastic, wood Empty cans

Could contain metal fragments, and so on. Dry ingredients

Could be contaminated with harmful extraneous materials Process Steps0

1. Mushroom receiving

Inadequate protection against harmful extraneous material could result in contamination of mushrooms

2. Can/end receiving

Inadequate protection against harmful extraneous material could result in contamination of cans and ends

3. Dry ingredient receiving

Inadequate protection against harmful extraneous material could result in contamination of ingredients

5. Mushroom storing

Inadequate protection against harmful extraneous material could result in contamination of raw mushrooms

6. Can/end storing

Inadequate protection against harmful extraneous material could result in contamination

7. Dry ingredient storing

Inadequate protection against harmful extraneous material could result in contamination of food ingredients 9. Can inspection/depalletizing

Empty cans coming from storage could contain harmful extraneous material which could result in contamination of food product 12. Can conveying

Inappropriate design and protection against harmful extraneous material could result in contamination of food product 14. Mushroom conveying/inspection

Inappropriate design and protection against harmful extraneous material could result in contamination of the mushrooms

Not applicable (not likely to get through equipment and inspection belt)

GMP/GHP (Receiving, storing, and transport)

GMP/GHP (Receiving, storing, and transport)

GMP/GHP (Premises)

GMP/GHP (Premises) GMP/GHP (Premises)

GMP/GHP (Premises, receiving, storage, and transport)

GMP/GHP (Premises, receiving, storage, and transport)

GMP/GHP (Premises, receiving, storage, and transport)

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