Info

Low

Medium

High

Significance of the hazard: Sa, satisfactory (negligible); Mi, minor; Ma, major; Cr, Critical

Significance of the hazard: Sa, satisfactory (negligible); Mi, minor; Ma, major; Cr, Critical

3.3.4. Hazard Assessment

3.3.4.1. Severity

Severity is the magnitude of a hazard or the degree of consequences that can result when a hazard exists. Disease-causing hazards can be categorized according to their severity.

• High (life-threatening). Examples include illnesses caused by Clostridium botulinum, Salmonella typhi, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus, paralytic shellfish poisoning, amnesic shellfish poisoning.

• Moderate (severe or chronic). Examples include illnesses caused by Brucella spp., Campylobacter spp.. Salmonella spp., Shigella spp. Streptococcus type A, Yersinia entercolitica, hepatitis A virus, mycotoxins, ciquatera toxin.

• Low (moderate or mild). Examples include illnesses caused by Bacillus spp., Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Norwalk virus, most parasites, histamine-like substances, and most heavy metals that cause mild acute illnesses.

Risk is a function of the probability of an adverse effect and the magnitude of that effect, consequential to a hazard(s) in food. Degrees of risk can be categorized as high (H), moderate (M), low (L), or negligible (N). By taking into account the probability of occurrence (the inverse proportion to the degree of control) and the severity of consequences, the significance of the hazard can be classified as satisfactory (Sa), minor (Mi), major (Ma), or critical (Cr) (24,26,27) (Table 12).

3.3.4.3. Identification of Points, Steps, and Procedures

The significance of the hazard can be differentiated as satisfactory (Sa), minor (Mi), major (Ma), or critical (Cr).

Note: Likelihood of occurrence is inversely proportional to the degree of control.

0 0

Post a comment