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a The quantitative data refer to the average European energy required to produce 1 kg of ethylene. Totals may not agree because of rounding.

a The quantitative data refer to the average European energy required to produce 1 kg of ethylene. Totals may not agree because of rounding.

Energy content of delivered fuel represents the energy that is received by the final operator who consumes energy. This is independent of country and is directly related to the technology used in the various processing operations because this governs the demand for energy. This group also contains any entries that arise as a result of the recovery of energy as steam or condensate because this recovered energy will be used by other processes and so appears as a negative entry (credit) in the energy table.

Feedstock energy represents the energy of the fuel bearing materials that are taken into the system but used as materials rather than fuels. The quantities of hydrocarbon feedstocks that are taken into the system are represented in terms of their gross calorific value because, frequently, in the course of processing, some, if not all, of this feedstock may be converted to a fuel. It is a simple matter to convert from feedstock energy to mass if the calorific value is known since the energy content of a feedstock is simply the product (calorific value x mass).

Energy use in transport refers to the energy associated with fuels consumed directly by the transport operations as well as any energy associated with the production of non-fuel-bearing materials, such as steel, that are taken into the transport process.

Fuel production and delivery energy represents the energy used by the fuel-producing industries in extracting the primary fuel from the earth, processing it, and delivering it to the ultimate consumer. This will also include the energy associated with the production of any nonfuel materials (such as steel) that are used in the fuel production process.

The importance of this breakdown is that energy content of delivered fuel and feedstock energy are dependent on the technology used by the process operators. In contrast, the fuel production and delivery energy depends upon the country in which the processes are carried out. Also, the transport column, depends on the geographical location of the plants and has nothing to do with the actual production process. If therefore the aim is to compare technologies or plants that are using the same technology, then the country-dependent data can be stripped out of the results by omitting the fuel production and delivery energy and transport energy columns. Alternatively, by adjusting the values in the fuel production and delivery energy column to suit local conditions, the energy table can be used to illustrate the effect of using the same technology in different geographical locations with different fuel infrastructures.

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