Complications

There are no intraocular complications after minimal segmental buckling without drainage, except for a rare choroidal in a highly myopic eye (about 0.3%). The remaining complications are extraocular and reversible: in less than 0.5%, a buckle infection or extrusion may occur, and, in about 1%, diplopia may occur. However, diplopia after segmental buckles can be reduced to a minimum by avoiding trauma to the perimysium of the muscles during surgery, i.e., by avoiding grasping muscles with sharp instruments or uncontrolled pulling on the traction sutures. In addition, starting on the first day postoperatively, the patient should practice binocular motility exercises in all directions several times a day; this should be done independent of the state of the retina. This will avert the development of muscular adherences to the sclera or neighboring tissues and postoperative diplopia.

Fig. 6.9. Lincoff-Kreissig Balloon. The presented balloon has (1) a metal stylette to facilitate insertion into the parabulbar space and (2) calibrations (black marks) on the tube to enable a more precise determination of the position of the balloon in the parabulbar space. Top: Deflated balloon catheter with stylette in place; beneath it the adapter. Bottom: Inflated balloon (0.75 ml of sterile water) with self-sealing valve in place; beneath it the withdrawn stylette

Fig. 6.9. Lincoff-Kreissig Balloon. The presented balloon has (1) a metal stylette to facilitate insertion into the parabulbar space and (2) calibrations (black marks) on the tube to enable a more precise determination of the position of the balloon in the parabulbar space. Top: Deflated balloon catheter with stylette in place; beneath it the adapter. Bottom: Inflated balloon (0.75 ml of sterile water) with self-sealing valve in place; beneath it the withdrawn stylette

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