C

Figure 1.13. Unusual course of Cantor tube through ileocolic fistula. Abnormal course of a Cantor tube is demonstrated on this supine abdominal radiograph (A). It apparently reaches the rectum, but does not enter the proximal colon. Anteroposterior (B) and lateral (C) films from a contrast exam reveal that the tube has transited an ileocolic fistula to reach the rectum.

Figure 1.13. Unusual course of Cantor tube through ileocolic fistula. Abnormal course of a Cantor tube is demonstrated on this supine abdominal radiograph (A). It apparently reaches the rectum, but does not enter the proximal colon. Anteroposterior (B) and lateral (C) films from a contrast exam reveal that the tube has transited an ileocolic fistula to reach the rectum.

Foreshortening of the small bowel over a nasoenteric tube is frequently demonstrated at contrast studies. This may progress to frank intussusception (Fig. 1.14). One article has suggested that when this foreshortening and pleating effect becomes fixed by adhesions, it may predispose the patient to the development of intussusception, even after the tube has been removed [39]. Even retrograde intussusceptions have been described [40].

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